Kiss Guilt Goodbye

Mary Whelchel, an expert on working moms, helps you be the parent God wants you to be

The Bible is often used to tell moms they shouldn't be working. How do you respond to that?


The Bible doesn't offer black-and-white directives about whether a mother should work. I do, however, find many principles about priorities. It's clear that women should be responsible for their households and put their families ahead of their careers.
Scripture does offer a great example of a woman who does both things well, the Proverbs 31 woman. She puts the Lord first and then takes care of her family before heading to the marketplace. She knows her calling and obeys.


That sounds good on paper, but working moms can still feel like they're missing out on big chunks of their kids' lives.


You will miss out on things an at-home mom might not, but it doesn't have to mean disaster. If you're where God wants you, you must trust God to fill in the gaps.
It's costly to give of yourself, your time and energy. Time you spend playing a game with your children when you'd rather be taking a quiet bubble bath or time when you really don't feel like going to a school function after working all day. These are very real sacrifices parents must make.
But God has given each of us gifts and talents (1 Cor. 12:4-6). He expects us to exercise these abilities, both in the home and the workplace. Career women can make a very real impact on this world. The Bible says "let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven" (Matt. 5:16). As a working mom, you can extend the light that shines in your own home into the world around you.

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May 25

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