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Encouraging Our Children to Expand Their World Vision

Encouraging Our Children to Expand Their World Vision

Why I want my children to understand that the life they live in affluent, suburban America isn't the norm
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Until my husband, Rich, became president of World Vision, we were, in many ways, blissfully unaware of much of what was going on in the world around us. We were raising five children from the ages of 6 to 19, and our world was limited by our own personal experiences. I suspect that's probably true of most families—I remember many days when my world seemed only as big as the space between our home, the local supermarket, our children's school, and the soccer field.

But beginning in August 1998, that all changed. As Rich took on the leadership of World Vision's U. S. office, I had the opportunity to travel to some of the most amazing places on the planet, and met children whose lives are very different from those of my own sons' and daughters'. After every trip, I couldn't wait to share what I learned from the children I met abroad with my own family.

I've met Thomas, a young boy who had the misfortune of growing up in Northern Uganda during a brutal civil war. At an age when most children are playing soccer or hanging out with friends, he was taken from his home and forced to become a child soldier.

Twelve-year-old Nagavini was sold into slavery so that the rest of her family could survive. She spent most of her young life in Vellore, India as a bonded laborer in a matchbox factory.

And in drought-stricken Niger, little Rakia stands knee-deep in a fetid pond as she draws water for her family to drink.

These are only three examples of children currently suffering in poverty around the world. Almost eight million children under the age of five die because of issues related to their poverty—19,000 children every single day. Over 1 billion people—1 out of every 6 living on planet earth—survive on less than a dollar a day, and one in eight has no access to clean water. Knowing all of this, I want my children to understand that the life they live in affluent, suburban America isn't the norm. I want them to be aware of the larger world around them, not only so that they better appreciat what they have ("Eat your vegetables. Don't you know there are children starving in Africa?"), but also so they would develop caring, compassionate hearts for others.

Here are some simple, profound ways we can help our children to become more aware of the world around them:

  1. Buy a world map and talk in age-appropriate ways about what it's like to live in other countries.
  2. Read stories about boys and girls growing up in places very different from suburban Seattle (or other metropolitan city).

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Rachel Monger

November 24, 2013  8:01am

This is a good encouragement! It is so important for kids to see the big picture of God's Kingdom and their part in it! We live in Tanzania and are so thankful to be raising our kids here! And with internet communication, they are able to share what life is like here with their friends in other places! If other kids in American or other cities would like to see a bit of life in African villages, they can share in it too on Amisadai and Louisa's Adventures in Africa ... www.mongergirls.blogspot.com And with messages back, it is good for our girls to see how things are in other places too! Rachel

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