Your Child Today: Baby

These Booties Are Made for Walkin'

It’s a question almost every parent asks: "When will my baby learn to walk?"

But did you know that before your child is even one month old, he?s already preparing to take his first tottering steps?

Every time your baby moves, she?s practicing ways to make her body act the way she wants it to. Infants develop from top to bottom. Head movements come first, then neck muscles begin to strengthen. Development continues on to the arms, hands, legs and feet. For example, once your baby learns to control her head and neck, she?s on her way to mastering sitting. Kicking, rolling, kneeling on all fours?these skills eventually combine to create crawling, and crawling leads to walking.

How and when a baby learns to crawl and then walk is a complicated matter. Everything in his surroundings plays a part. The relationship between what?s around him and how he?s allowed to interact with his environment are vital to his development. Experts have learned that babies who receive lots of physical and visual stimulation early on will crawl and walk earlier than babies who are often confined to a crib or playpen.

Under your close supervision, your baby should be allowed the freedom to explore her world. Remember to provide lots of encouragement, offering praise for her successes, even if she?s simply reaching out to grab a stuffed bear. It?s this kind of learning that will prepare her for the bigger things like walking.

It?s important to remember that every baby has his own timetable. Learning and perfecting physical skills require both coordination and mental readiness. Pressuring your baby to take his first steps before he?s ready can cause more frustration than success. While it?s fine to encourage your baby to walk, don?t overdo it. And keep in mind that crawling is more than a stop on the way to walking. It?s an important develop mental milestone in itself. Since a moving baby has greater control of her world, crawling allows her to decide where to go and what to explore. It develops muscles, builds coordination and contributes to your baby?s intelligence.

Member access onlyYou have reached the end of this Article Preview
To continue reading, join now for free and get complete access.
orJoin Now for Free

Read more articles that highlight writing by Christian women at ChristianityToday.com/Women

Free CT Women Newsletter

Sign up for our free Marriage & Family newsletter: CT's weekly newsletter to help women grow their marriage and family relationships through biblical principles.

Read These Next

  • Also in This Issue
    Remote ControlMember Access Only
    Teach your kids to turn off Trashy TV
  • Related Issue
    Letting GoMember Access Only
    I'm having trouble letting my three boys go out on their own. They are still young, but I see their friends staying home alone or walking to other friends' houses. What kind of guidelines should I use to give them a little more freedom?
  • Editor's PickA Prostitute and a Gallon of Milk
    A Prostitute and a Gallon of MilkMember Access Only
    The surprising lesson Rahab teaches us about faith

Comments

Join in the conversation on Facebook or Twitter

May 25

Follow Us

More Newsletters

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
RSS