Designed to Be Brave

My brave may look different than yours, but when we choose to step out and take risks, we are changed—and those around us change, too
Designed to Be Brave

Brave.

Every time I mention it, women's eyes sparkle. Perhaps we see Disney's red-headed Irish princess bucking tradition, or maybe a bold Middle Earth beauty taking up her sword in battle. Marketers take careful aim at us with brave movies and brave songs, and a shoe sales campaign sports the slogan, "Hello, brave girl!" Brave means strong, heroic and needed. Something deep inside us stirs, long buried, almost forgotten.

Do you feel it? I do.

Here's a question: what if women want to be brave because God designed us that way? What if God had warrior princesses (with or without red hair) in mind as he fashioned Eve from Adam's side? It's not as crazy as it might sound.

"God's original team is male and female and his plan is perfect. We'd better think a little harder about this."

If we talk about female design, we'll have to start where God creates the woman as a helper (Genesis 2:18). God doesn't make another guy to share Adam's man cave. He makes a woman a feminine reflection of God's image. She's not exactly like the man; she's compatible and yet different—as any woman who's lived, worked or talked with a man knows!

What was God thinking? I wonder about that when my husband and I misunderstand each other yet again, or when my 11-year-old son exhibits "testosterone poisoning" with his gross noises. But God's original team is male and female, and his plan is perfect. We'd better think a little harder about this.

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