Mommy Porn and the Christian Woman

Dr. Juli Slattery believes there's more to authentic intimacy
Mommy Porn and the Christian Woman

When the book series Fifty Shades of Grey was published in 2012, it lit a fire in women of all ages. Mothers with toddlers afoot and older women alike snapped up the erotic fiction, sending it quickly to the top of the New York Times best-sellers list, setting a record by besting even Harry Potter as the fastest-selling paperback book. The success of the Grey trilogy has boosted sales of all women's erotica—literature about sexual love—making it the fastest-growing genre in publishing today. Now many fans of the series are lining up in theaters to watch a new film based on the book.

So are these fictional, sex fantasies just harmless fun that help awaken the libido of women who may feel sex-starved? Or are they dangerous for our hearts and minds? I met with Dr. Juli Slattery to talk about women and erotica. A TCW featured contributor, Juli is a psychologist, co-founder of Authentic Intimacy, and co-author (with Dannah Gresh) of the book Pulling Back the Shades (Moody Publishing). This new book explores some of the deep longings and desires women have that draw them to books like Fifty Shades of Grey and champions what Scripture says about our God-given sexuality and desire for relational intimacy.

Erotica has become the fastest-selling genre in book sales right now. What's fueling this trend?

I think there are a couple factors fueling it. We live in a highly sexualized culture, and women as well as men are getting bombarded with temptation. Traditionally we've thought of pornography as a man's problem. But over the last 10 to 15 years, it's increasingly becoming a woman's issue too. Pornography, at its most basic level, invites us to be sexually active with something that's not real. It's a false intimacy—an imitation just to get a cheap thrill. For a man that might come in the form of visual stimulation. But for a woman, erotica is a particularly powerful form of pornography because there's a storyline—there are characters, imagination, and fantasy that involve sexuality. It involves the whole of what a woman is longing for, but it's elusive and it can become addictive.

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Marian Liautaud

Marian V. Liautaud is director of marketing at Aspen Group. Follow her on Twitter @marianliautaud

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May 25

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