Examining Adoption Ethics

The Adoption Crisis, Part 1

Let’s work together to protect children, birth families, communities, and the kingdom.
The Adoption Crisis, Part 1

[Disclaimer] There are so many children who are truly orphaned, with the numbers skewed toward older kids and sick kids. This is a real crisis. There are also adoption agencies with impeccable ethics both here and abroad. Plenty of adoptive families went in eyes wide open, prioritizing transparency and thoroughness. This is not an all-bad or all-good scenario, but a little yeast leavens the entire batch, and no decent parent I know wants to be complicit in corrupt adoptions. That’s why I believe this conversation deserves its place among believers.

I’m wading into difficult adoption territory today, a space wrought with defensiveness and big feelings and confusion. Let’s cover this conversation with grace and truth and move gently through it together.

I’m not hearing enough about prioritizing birth families and empowering them to raise their own children—not even from well-meaning adoptive parents.

We can begin here: money has always been a magnet for corruption. Sometimes when you offer large amounts of money, a person will do anything to get it, even something knowingly harmful. Let’s stipulate that rich Americans flooding impoverished countries with millions of dollars to adopt their children will absolutely garner attention. While there are obviously lots of true orphans, without question, that much cash flow will generate some “created orphans” to satisfy demand, especially for babies.

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May 25

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